Is the weather bugging your crops?

Is the weather bugging your crops?

Dave Pike, Ph.D.
Senior Scientist

Andrew Pritchard  
Meteorologist      

The tropical storm that passed up through Alabama to Michigan on the 29th and 30th of May could have had a message for the crops along its path. Dense and fast moving storms like Alberto have winds capable of dislodging insects and disease spores from host crops or plants in the Gulf Coast states and then depositing them in the heavy rains dropped on corn and soybean fields as it moved north.

Despite Irma, Corn Belt will stay dry for the next several days

Despite Irma, Corn Belt will stay dry for the next several days

Eric Snodgrass
Principal Atmospheric Scientist

The last 36 hours of weather observations have allowed weather forecast models to hone in on Irma's eventual path through Florida. We expect a late Saturday landfall at Category 3+ intensity (likely Category 4-5 intensity) along the southern tip of Florida. Hurricane Irma, which is the size of Texas, will traverse the state from the south to the north, bringing hurricane force winds to the entire width of the peninsula.

Cooler and drier weather for the Corn Belt, potential flooding for Texas and Mississippi

Cooler and drier weather for the Corn Belt, potential flooding  for Texas and Mississippi

Eric Snodgrass
Senior Atmospheric Scientist

As forecast in our early Monday update, beneficial rains fell across a large section of the Corn Belt over the last 24 hours. While the clouds did obscure the view for many during the eclipse, the rains will go a long way to help the corn and soybean crops finish well.

Dry for the Corn Belt, potential flooding hazard from Central Plains through the Southeast.

Dry for the Corn Belt, potential flooding hazard from  Central Plains through the Southeast.

Eric Snodgrass
Senior Atmospheric Scientist

A large ridge over the western U.S. has introduced very hot temperatures to the West Coast and air quality is quite bad due to smoke from fires—especially in Washington. But, that same ridge is part of the overall flow pattern that has produced a trough for the central and eastern U.S.

Agrible® integrates with FieldWatch® to help growers see sensitive crops and make good spraying decisions

Jason Little
Director of Sales

Applying herbicides has become increasingly more complex over the last few years. New chemistries and genetics came with new label restrictions, and consumer demand has increased the number of organic, non-GMO, and specialty crop acres. Add in highly variable weather, and the logistical issues are quite clear.

Worried about dicamba? Agrible has the tool to help you spray responsibly.

Dave Pike, Ph.D.
Senior Scientist

It seems that every few years Midwest agriculture experiences crop injury resulting from misapplication of herbicides, as growers learn ways to adapt to the changes in technology. This year, numerous cotton fields across the South and soybean fields throughout the Midwest show evidence of dicamba injury.